Dare I say it: If you have a top 10 fly selection, the Muddler Minnow must be included? Twenty, maybe ten years ago, that was the typical advice. A Muddler with the Adams, Pheasant Tail Nymph, Hare’s Ear, Elk Hair Caddis……….. “Popularized by Dan Bailey of Livingston, Montana, the Muddler Minnow should always be in your fly box. I have met fly fishers who fish almost exclusively with Muddler Minnow patterns. Along with its offshoot, the Marabou Muddler, this pattern has probably taken more large fish than any other fly.” http://www.glaciertoyellowstone.com/basics/step5.cfm    Hmmm, maybe in Montana, but I seriously doubt West of Montana?

But, do any of you really go to the Muddler? I would venture to say more go to a Spuddler now. I believe once the Woolly Worm evolved into the Woolly Bugger, the Muddler and other streamer patterns seemed to fade to the back up fly boxes. You look at it, like ‘I really ought to give that a try’. I have a crawdad pattern my son has tied. Looks damn good. I fish it, but that only lasts 5-10 minutes and then back to the recently proven patterns. If it ever entices the big one or several smaller ones within that 5-10 minute window, I may fish it longer.

That all said, it is obviously a long ago proven pattern. The fish have not changed, so I am vowing to fish the Muddler this Fall. I know in Southern BC, a Rolled Muddler is often used for Chum Salmon. So, I am looking at Silvers, Chum, Chinook, Browns, Redsides and Kamloops within the next two months or so. I honestly only have about a dozen Muddlers left and few the same. But, I will fish what I have, see how they do before commencing a tying campaign. You can tell I can’t spin deer hair worth mierda.     

Muddler Minnow~SB
Muddler Minnow~SB

 

Green Muddler Minnow~SB
Green Muddler Minnow~SB
Classic Muddler Minnow~SB
Classic Muddler Minnow~SB
Muddler Minnow~SB
Muddler Minnow~SB

http://globalflyfisher.com/patterns/muddler/deerhair.html (EXCELLENT HOW TO TIE!)

http://globalflyfisher.com/staff/allerton/muddler.html (How to fish the Muddler Minnow)